Learning From Those Touched By Rare Disease 1

Rare Disease Day

Our most rare or unique qualities can often be our greatest strengths, but when it comes to disease, rarity is a tremendous challenge. A rare disease, also known as an orphan disease, is any disease that affects a small percentage of people. In the United States, a disease is considered rare if it affects fewer than 200,000 people at any given time. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), there are more than 6,800 rare diseases. Though each of these diseases are rare, having a rare disease of some sort is not. Approximately 30 million Americans, or almost one in every 10 people, suffer from a rare disease.

Living With a Rare Disease

The numbers cited above are interesting, but they don’t tell the whole story. The rest of the story relates to the daily struggles of rare disease patients and their support networks. Rare disease symptoms vary even among patients suffering from the same disease. This symptom variability, combined with lack of scientific understanding and awareness, can lead to delayed diagnosis and difficulty accessing treatment. Patient quality of life is severely affected by the “loss of autonomy due to the chronic, progressive, degenerative, and frequently life-threatening aspects of the disease.”

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Iodine’s Approach to Simplifying Drug Information Reply

Photo by Ryan McGuire from Gratisography.com

Photo by Ryan McGuire from Gratisography.com

At Lilly COI, we remain keenly interested in new tools, models, technologies and approaches to addressing healthcare information challenges and to considering how they might be applied to improve clinical research. Through our online travels, we’ve recently come across Iodine and find some of the concepts within their approach worth sharing.

With thousands of prescription and over-the-counter drugs currently on the market, the process of trying to understand what you’re taking can be intimidating and confusing. The idea of reading all the tiny print on the package inserts can be overwhelming. And oftentimes, doing a Google search doesn’t provide much additional help. The search results can include articles from medical journals, websites that list basic drug information and side effects, and discussion boards where patients share their individual experiences with a drug. How do you find time to sift through all of that and make sense of it?

Similar problems plague the process of finding a clinical trial, and of getting access to easily understandable results of the trial afterward. Finding ways to streamline this information and make it more readily available to people is becoming an area of increasing focus. Companies like Iodine are providing us with some examples of how this can be done.

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Identifying Cancer Incidence and Clinical Research Sites 1

According to the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), 8.2 million people die from cancer worldwide each year. And that number is set to rise. To address the cancer epidemic, the UICC organizes World Cancer Day on February 4 of each year. The day was created “to raise awareness about the disease and to develop practical strategies to address the cancer burden.”

The 2015 World Cancer Day tagline is “Not Beyond Us,” which is intended to highlight that solutions to cancer care are within reach. Four key areas of focus support this theme. For each of the four areas, UICC defines targets to achieve by the year 2025 and the challenge to achieving these targets. UICC also describes how we can overcome the challenge to meeting their targets for each focus area. Learn more about each of the focus areas here:

Cancer Incidence and Clinical Research

Click to view U.S map illustrating cancer incidence and locations of enrolling cancer clinical trials.

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E-patient Voices Can Inspire Change in Clinical Trials 1

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The culture we will live in next month is a direct result of what people like us share today. The things we share and don’t share determine what happens next.”

 Seth Godin

In a recent post on his blog, successful marketer and entrepreneur Seth Godin says that we are what we share. He believes that sharing our stories and ideas takes courage, and that it is “a generous way to change your world for the better.”

The world of clinical trials is one that still could use some change. Many trials struggle to recruit patients, which hinders our ability to get important treatments to patients in a timely manner. The reasons for struggling enrollment are complex, but the root cause is often a lack of awareness. As an industry, we’ve undertaken various initiatives to increase awareness, but these initiatives have had limited impact to date. And maybe that’s because it’s not us who potential trial participants most want to hear. Instead, maybe it’s fellow patients.

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